Stewardship Recognition

Watershed Guardian Award Watershed Guardian Award Watershed Guardian Award Watershed Guardian Award Watershed Guardian Award Watershed Guardian Award Watershed Guardian Award Watershed Guardian Award Watershed Guardian Award Watershed Guardian Award Watershed Guardian Award Watershed Guardian Award Watershed Guardian Award Watershed Guardian Award

Watershed Guardian Award

The Watershed Guardian Award program is carried out by the BWA Awareness and Education Committee. The purpose of this program is to recognize individuals, businesses, and organizations in the Beaver Watershed community who have demonstrated Best Management Practices for water quality. These awardees have gone above and beyond to work towards good water quality for our region and have served as an inspiration to those around them to follow their example. Awardees thus far include the late Henry D. Griffith, the Madison County Solid Waste and Recycling Center, Alan Bland, Mike Tillery, and Stacy Cheevers. Henry Griffith was recognized for his efforts in West Fork through founding the West Fork EPA, now known as the West Fork Watershed Alliance, and organizing the West Fork Cleanup. The Madison County Solid Waste and Recycling Center in Huntsville was recognized as a facility which goes beyond basic recycling to collect household hazardous waste, keeping the watershed cleaner and safer for drinking. Alan Bland was recognized for his leadership of the Beaver Lake Cleanup for the past 15 years, and his educational programs that have reached thousands of people in our region. Mike Tillery was recognized for his stewardship ethic and use of Best Management Practices on his farm along the East Fork of the White River. Stacy Cheevers was recognized for his implementation of practices such as nutrient management, off-stream watering, and many other BMPs that he uses on his property. Jane Maginot was recognized for her development of the Northwest Arkansas UpStream Art project, which uses art to educate the public about urban stormwater pollution. The City of Fayetteville was recognized for its streamside protection efforts.

Jim Woodruff was recognized for the forest management practices in place on his 1,800 acre tree farm to increase forest health and wildlife habitat. Huntsville High School EAST was recognized for several years of annual cleanup efforts on Town Branch in Huntsville which have diverted thousands of pounds of waste from War Eagle Creek. Rhiannon Bowlin was recognized for her volunteerism and leadership to clean up the West Fork at the annual West Fork Cleanup and on her own time for over eight consecutive years. Hobbs State Park was recognized their many land stewardship practices including forest management and low impact development, as well as their conservation education programs. The Madison County 4-H Shooting Stars Club was recognized for their dedicated volunteerism to plant native trees and rain gardens in the War Eagle Creek Watershed. The Ozark Highlands Trail Association was recognized for sustainable trail building, land conservation, and support of litter cleanup efforts in the East Fork of the White River Watershed. The Watershed Conservation Resource Center (WCRC) was recognized for two miles of river restoration in the West Fork-White River Watershed and 12 years of watershed assessment and restoration activities.

Awards are given out at events across the watershed throughout the year, and nominations are accepted on a rolling basis.

The Beaver Watershed Alliance Watershed Guardian Award Nomination Form - Download Form

2013 Awardees

2014 Awardees

2015 Awardees

2016 Awardees